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John T. Roberts
Professor
104 Caldwell Hall
work(919) 689-6294 (phone)
Director of Undergraduate Studies

John T. Roberts works primarily in the philosophy of science.  His book The Law-Governed Universe was published in 2009 by Oxford University Press.  His published articles include:  "Fine Tuning and the Infra-Red Bullseye,"Philosophical Studies (forthcoming);  "Chance without Credence," British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (forthcoming); "Some Laws are Contingent," Australasian Journal of Philosophy (2010); "A Puzzle about Laws, Symmetries, and Measurable Quantities," British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (2008); "Leibniz on Force and Absolute Motion," Philosophy of Science (2003); "Contact with the Nomic, Parts I and II" (co-authored with John Earman) Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (2005); and "Ceteris Paribus, There is No Problem of Provisos" (co-authored with John Earman), Synthese (1999).  He is currently working on the problem of induction, chance, probabilistic laws, and an a normativist approach to laws and counterfactuals.

 

Forthcoming: 

Laws, Measurement and Counterfactuals.  Forthcoming in a volume edited by Stephen Mumford and Matthew Tugby.

Fine-Tuning and the Infrared Bull's Eye.   Forthcoming in Philosophical Studies; link.

Chance without Credence.  Forthcoming in British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.


 

Works in Progress:

 

 

Normativism about Nomic Necessity, Counterfactuals, and Perhaps Dispositions.

Laws About Frequencies?

 Laws About Frequencies. 

Concerning Reichenbach's Neglected Remarks on the Ravens Paradox.

 

Book:

The Law-Governed Universe (Oxford University Press, 2009) at Google Books

Or, you could BUY IT at:

     OUP

     Amazon

     Barnes and Noble

A Precis (Ha!)  of The Law-Governed Universe.  (This is a 42-page summary of the main argument of the book.)


Some Published Articles:

Some Laws of Nature are Metaphysically Contingent.   Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 88(3):  445-457, 2010.

A Puzzle about  Laws, Symmetries, and Measurable Quantities.  British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59: 143-168, 2008.

Contact with the Nomic:  A Challenge for Deniers of Humean Supervenience about Laws of Nature, Part I:  Humean Supervenience (with John Earman).  Philosophy and Phenomenologial Research 71(1): 1-22, 2005.

Contact with the Nomic:  A Challenge for Deniers of Humean Supervenience about Laws of Nature, Part II:  The Epistemological Argument for Humean Supervenience (with John Earman).  Philosophy and Phenomenologial Research 71(2): 253-286, 2005.

Measurability and Physical Laws.  Synthese 144(3): 433-447, 2005.

Leibniz on Force and Absolute Motion, Philosophy of Science 70:553-573, 2003.

Ceteris Paribus Lost (With John Earman and Sheldon Smith). Erkenntnis 57(3): 281-301, 2002.

Ceteris Paribus, There is No Problem of Provisos (with John Earman).  Synthese 118: 439-478, 1999.

Lewis, Carroll, and Seeing Through the Looking Glass.  Australasian Journal of Philosophy  76(3): 426-438, 1998.

 

Some Unpublished Papers:

The Semantic Novelty of Theoretical Terms

Coping with Severe Test Anxiety:  Problems and Prospects for an Error-Statistical Philosophy of Science.

 

Readings for Current Courses:

Slides

 

Complete CV:

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